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EMPLOYMENT LAW UPDATE

Non-compete agreements and deceiving your employer

By Lynne Curry Question: I was so stoked when the premier firm in my area of professional services hired me that I did something I’ve wanted to do for a long time. I told my former manager what I thought of her. She ordered me to leave her company immediately. No problem, I had a new job to go to. I also had my entire future mapped out. I’d work for my new employer for a year, learn everything I could, and then start my business. I told all my friends my new job was the ideal stepping stone. On my first day when I went through orientation, my new manager handed me an employment agreement that included a noncompete agreement. It was a complete shock. I’d never seen one… . . . read more.

PRODUCTIVITY

5 reasons to hire a medical scribe

As the manager of a medical office, you understand how crucial it is to provide quality patient care while also maintaining efficient operations. One way to achieve this is by hiring a medical scribe. In this article, we will explore what a medical scribe does, why your office might want to hire one, and how to find the right candidate. What is a Medical Scribe? A medical scribe is a trained professional who works alongside healthcare providers to assist with patient documentation. This can include recording patient histories, physical exams, lab results, and other important information in the patient’s electronic health record (EHR). Medical scribes can also help with administrative tasks, such as entering orders and scheduling appointments. Why Hire a Medical Scribe? There are several reasons why your medical… . . . read more.

HIRING

“You’re not hired:” Leaving job candidates hanging can hurt your reputation

When companies engage with job candidates, a new survey reveals the importance of following up—even if they opt not to hire them. The Conference Board survey found that 18 percent of candidates who didn’t hear back from a company after an interview took a negative action against the company. That includes declining to recommend it to others or leaving a negative review. And only 7 percent applied for another job at the same company in the future. Indeed, businesses that don’t respond to job seekers risk taking a reputational hit, losing out on future talent who read a negative review, heard an unfavorable opinion about the company, or who felt mistreated during a previous experience with them. Additionally, the survey revealed that the number of interviews a candidate must endure… . . . read more.

WORKING WITH PATIENTS

Why and how to find translators for your patients

In today’s diverse world, it’s essential for healthcare providers to be able to communicate effectively with patients of all backgrounds. Sometimes this task falls to families, friends or supporters of a patient. These helpers are not always available or able to help. This is where medical translators come in. In this article, we’ll explore why your medical office might need translators and how to acquire them. Why Your Medical Office May Need Translators: Improved Patient Care: Patients who don’t speak the language of their healthcare providers are more likely to miss out on important information regarding their diagnosis, treatment, and medication. This can lead to misunderstandings, miscommunication, and ultimately poorer patient outcomes. Medical translators can help bridge this communication gap, improving patient care. Legal Compliance: Medical facilities that receive federal… . . . read more.

HIRING

Create a great job description and make it your blueprint for hiring

By Robert Half Trying to compete for top medical office talent in a tough hiring market? Here’s another question: Do you know how to create a job description that can help you find the right candidates and set the stage for a new employee’s success? The job description is your hiring blueprint, and it needs to be thoroughly thought (or rethought) through. Do it well, and the rest of the hiring process—from evaluating resumes and job applications to candidate selection, interviews and salary negotiation—will flow much more easily. But writing it poorly risks a prolonged, expensive hiring process and increases the possibility of making a bad hire. As you gather details to update or write a job description, you may want to seek input, if appropriate, from key personnel who will work directly with the new hire. These individuals may be… . . . read more.

HIRING

Prepare and practice for conducting an online job interview

By Robert Half By now, you’ve likely discovered the advantages of conducting a remote interview. It’s convenient for you and the candidate, it’s easier to schedule separate interviews with the hiring committee, it saves you the cost of a candidate’s lunch or travel expenses, and you can conduct more assessments more quickly. Most importantly, and especially in this very challenging labor market,  the remote interview allows you to meet your top candidates and make a hiring decision before many old-school competitors can even finalize arrangements for an on-site meet-and-greet. Still, the remote interview presents a few complications. Details you never had to consider when interviewing at the office—your background, screen presence and technology, for example—must now be part of any well-planned meeting. Otherwise, you risk mishaps that can distract and… . . . read more.

HIRING

Dig deeper with these 4 types of interview questions

By Robert Half If you want to identify the best candidate for a job, you have to ask the right questions during the interview. And that takes preparation. You need to evaluate not only the job candidate’s skill sets and experience but also how the interviewee thinks. That requires you to ask the right types of interview questions, with both closed-ended questions and open-ended questions. Other kinds of queries can produce even more nuanced information to help you with your hiring decision. Here are four types of interview questions employers ask, including when to use them— and pitfalls to avoid. 1. Closed-ended interview questions This category of job interview questions calls for simple, informational answers. Often, they can be just a “yes” or “no,” but you should give candidates an opportunity to… . . . read more.

HIRING

4 tips for safely searching social media when hiring

It is generally acceptable for employers to search social media as part of the hiring process, provided that they do so in a fair and nondiscriminatory manner. However, there are some considerations to keep in mind when using social media in the hiring process: Relevant information only: It is important to only consider information that is relevant to the job in question. For example, if a candidate has posted inappropriate or offensive content on social media, this may be relevant to the employer if the job involves interacting with the public or representing the company in a professional manner. However, personal beliefs or opinions that are not directly related to the job may not be relevant. Privacy concerns: Employers should be aware of the privacy rights of candidates and should… . . . read more.

YOUR CAREER

5 ways to improve your job search

It doesn’t hurt to have a plan in case you find yourself looking for a new job. Although the demand for skilled talent remains strong, professionals need to be increasingly strategic and intentional when making career moves, says David King, a senior managing director with Robert Half, a global talent solutions and business consulting firm. “Workers should make a point of highlighting the value they bring to potential employers. This begins with knowing what companies seek in prospective hires, and pulling relevant strengths to the forefront.” A recent survey by Robert Half reveals five key considerations for those launching a job search. Resume red flags— When evaluating candidates’ resumes, top factors that give employers pause include: Frequent job hopping (80 per cent) Insufficient skills for the position (80 per cent) Vague… . . . read more.

HIRING

Should we offer sign-on bonuses?

By Lynne Curry Question: We went through a rigorous recruiting process and found the right new hire for our company. Our entire team loved her, from our managers to our employees, who met her when she did a walk through our offices. We made her an offer and were surprised asked for a day to consider it, as she’d been giving us consistent “you’re the company I want to work for” messages for weeks. The next day she called and said, “I’m very sorry. I liked everything I learned about all of you and your company, but another excellent employer offered me a $10K signing bonus. I’ve accepted their proposal. You’re a wonderful company and the person you hire will be lucky to work for you.” She blindsided us—she never… . . . read more.


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