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HIRING

Create a great job description and make it your blueprint for hiring

Trying to compete for top medical office talent in a tough hiring market? Here’s another question: Do you know how to create a job description that can help you find the right candidates and set the stage for a new employee’s success? The job description is your hiring blueprint, and it needs to be thoroughly thought (or rethought) through. Do it well, and the rest of the hiring process—from evaluating resumes and job applications to candidate selection, interviews and salary negotiation—will flow much more easily. But writing it poorly risks a prolonged, expensive hiring process and increases the possibility of making a bad hire. As you gather details to update or write a job description, you may want to seek input, if appropriate, from key personnel who will work directly with the new hire. These individuals may be able to provide… . . . read more.

HIRING

Prepare and practice for conducting an online job interview

By Robert Half By now, you’ve likely discovered the advantages of conducting a remote interview. It’s convenient for you and the candidate, it’s easier to schedule separate interviews with the hiring committee, it saves you the cost of a candidate’s lunch or travel expenses, and you can conduct more assessments more quickly. Most importantly, and especially in this very challenging labor market,  the remote interview allows you to meet your top candidates and make a hiring decision before many old-school competitors can even finalize arrangements for an on-site meet-and-greet. Still, the remote interview presents a few complications. Details you never had to consider when interviewing at the office—your background, screen presence and technology, for example—must now be part of any well-planned meeting. Otherwise, you risk mishaps that can distract and… . . . read more.

HIRING

Dig deeper with these 4 types of interview questions

By Robert Half If you want to identify the best candidate for a job, you have to ask the right questions during the interview. And that takes preparation. You need to evaluate not only the job candidate’s skill sets and experience but also how the interviewee thinks. That requires you to ask the right types of interview questions, with both closed-ended questions and open-ended questions. Other kinds of queries can produce even more nuanced information to help you with your hiring decision. Here are four types of interview questions employers ask, including when to use them— and pitfalls to avoid. 1. Closed-ended interview questions This category of job interview questions calls for simple, informational answers. Often, they can be just a “yes” or “no,” but you should give candidates an opportunity to… . . . read more.

HIRING

4 tips for safely searching social media when hiring

It is generally acceptable for employers to search social media as part of the hiring process, provided that they do so in a fair and nondiscriminatory manner. However, there are some considerations to keep in mind when using social media in the hiring process: Relevant information only: It is important to only consider information that is relevant to the job in question. For example, if a candidate has posted inappropriate or offensive content on social media, this may be relevant to the employer if the job involves interacting with the public or representing the company in a professional manner. However, personal beliefs or opinions that are not directly related to the job may not be relevant. Privacy concerns: Employers should be aware of the privacy rights of candidates and should… . . . read more.

YOUR CAREER

5 ways to improve your job search

It doesn’t hurt to have a plan in case you find yourself looking for a new job. Although the demand for skilled talent remains strong, professionals need to be increasingly strategic and intentional when making career moves, says David King, a senior managing director with Robert Half, a global talent solutions and business consulting firm. “Workers should make a point of highlighting the value they bring to potential employers. This begins with knowing what companies seek in prospective hires, and pulling relevant strengths to the forefront.” A recent survey by Robert Half reveals five key considerations for those launching a job search. Resume red flags— When evaluating candidates’ resumes, top factors that give employers pause include: Frequent job hopping (80 per cent) Insufficient skills for the position (80 per cent) Vague… . . . read more.

HIRING

Should we offer sign-on bonuses?

By Lynne Curry Question: We went through a rigorous recruiting process and found the right new hire for our company. Our entire team loved her, from our managers to our employees, who met her when she did a walk through our offices. We made her an offer and were surprised asked for a day to consider it, as she’d been giving us consistent “you’re the company I want to work for” messages for weeks. The next day she called and said, “I’m very sorry. I liked everything I learned about all of you and your company, but another excellent employer offered me a $10K signing bonus. I’ve accepted their proposal. You’re a wonderful company and the person you hire will be lucky to work for you.” She blindsided us—she never… . . . read more.

PRODUCTIVITY

Forget multitasking! Here are 4 ways to improve your focus and get more done

It’s a typical day at work. You’re on the computer, entering data, while you’re talking on the phone. A staff member comes to your office door, stack of papers in hand, and you motion for her to come in and put the papers on your desk. You continue your phone conversation, momentarily removing your hands from the keyboard in order look through the papers. You’re a multitasking dynamo! But are you really an efficient and effective manager? In fact, researchers find that the interruptions caused by switching tasks have a negative effect on the retention of information. Multitasking is inefficient The problem has to do with the impact of distraction and how it affects memory. Older adults especially have difficulty reengaging quickly when tasks are interrupted. In other words, while… . . . read more.

HIRING

College…no longer the golden ticket for employers or employees

By Lynne Curry College was once the “golden ticket” to the American Dream of greater job security and higher lifetime wages. In the last decade, however, college enrollments have declined. According to a recent Harris poll, 51% of U.S. adults report that skyrocketing college costs have decreased their ability to pursue a post-high school education.1 Although 62% of U.S. employees 25 or older lack a college degree, some employers still use the college degree as gatekeeper when assessing which candidate to hire or promote.2 Does this work any longer, or are employers missing out on skilled employees with talent and drive because the best potential hires lacked the time and money to attend college? No longer the only path Some employers, perhaps forced by the Great Resignation to seek out… . . . read more.

EMPLOYEE BENEFITS

Staff continuing education: Must you or should you pay for it?

By Paul Edwards I’m looking to hire a new employee and they asked me about my policy on paying for employee CE. I normally don’t pay for employee CE but it sounds important to this potential new employee. What is the best way to handle this? Many individuals working in healthcare fields have annual continuing education (CE) requirements they need to meet in order to maintain certain licenses. Meeting that requirement is an obligation on the individual, not on the practice. Of course, you should keep track of whether your employees have a valid license and are meeting the requirements for renewing it, otherwise it does become a problem for the practice. While you may not be required to help pay for the cost of license renewals or CEs taken… . . . read more.

HIRING

Follow these tips to check references right

By Robert Half You’re hiring and have identified your top candidate for the role based on resumes and multiple rounds of interviews. So you’re set to make a job offer, right? Not quite yet—now it’s time to check references. Sure, you could take everything the candidate has said at face value, but due diligence demands that you get input from managers they’ve worked under at previous companies. Pros and cons of reference checks Getting references from your top job candidates’ former employers isn’t as simple as it used to be. Because managers know that revealing too much or too little can have legal consequences, they are increasingly wary of what and how much they say about past employees and their work histories. Some companies have been sued for not disclosing… . . . read more.


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