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PRODUCTIVITY

Technical issues and too many participants are biggest virtual meeting pet peeves

If you’re tired of video meetings, you’re not alone. A new study by global staffing firm Robert Half shows video calls may be wearing on workers. Almost three-quarters of professionals surveyed (72 per cent) said they participate in virtual meetings. Those respondents reported spending about a quarter of their workday (24 per cent) on camera with business contacts or colleagues. In addition: 44 per cent said they’ve experienced video call fatigue since the start of the pandemic. 59 per cent said video calls can be helpful but are not always necessary. 22 per cent noted that the practicality and novelty of video conferencing has worn off over the past eight months. 15 per cent confirmed they find virtual meetings inefficient and exhausting and prefer to communicate via other channels, like email… . . . read more.

KICKBACKS

OIG issues fraud alert on pharmaceutical company in-person speaker programs

Before the pandemic put the chill on live conference events, it was fairly common for pharmaceutical companies, device makers and diagnostics companies to offer healthcare professionals fees for in-person speaking appearances. Such practices raise red flags under the federal Anti-Kickback Statute (AKS) when those speakers recommend the products of those companies to their patients. So, on Nov. 16, the OIG issued a Special Fraud Alert warning companies about restarting in-person paid healthcare professional speaker programs when COVID-19 restrictions lift. OIG Skepticism of Speaker Fees Program Federal government suspicion of paid speaker programs, especially by pharmaceutical companies, is nothing new. For example, Novartis recently agreed to pay $678 million to settle a seven-year-long legal battle with the OIG over allegations of using its speaker programs as a way to disguise bribes to… . . . read more.

AUTOMATIC PAYMENT

Clinicians in three disaster-struck states get MIPS break

If your medical practice is located within the disaster-struck states of Louisiana, California or Oregon you may be eligible for a payment adjustment. In response to the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) designation of Hurricane Laura and the California and Oregon wildfires as national disasters, CMS has determined that the automatic extreme and uncontrollable circumstances policy will be applied to Merit-based Incentive Payment System (MIPS) eligible clinicians in FEMA-identified areas under sections PA-A and PA-B in Louisiana,  California, and Oregon. MIPS eligible clinicians in these areas in 2020 will be automatically identified and receive a neutral payment adjustment for the 2022 MIPS payment year. During the data submission period for the 2020 performance year (Jan. 4, 2021 to March 31, 2021), all four performance categories for these clinicians will be weighted at… . . . read more.


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