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ONBOARDING

Don’t forget this crucial first step with your new hires

 By Lynne Curry It’s a crucial first step many managers fail to take. Swamped by other work, they greet their new hires, introduce them to the employees they’re replacing, and leave to attend to other pressing duties. On the surface, this makes sense. The departing employee can easily explain the work that needs to be done. Beneath the surface, this approach carries with it significant risk. If you’re a new hire’s  manager, you want your new employee’s first experience with you to be “I’m looking forward to working with you. Let’s establish what your priorities are and how we can best work together” and not “hello, see you later.” Although your departing employee may be able to outline your new employee’s job duties, they may also communicate an impression different… . . . read more.

YOUR CAREER

How job hunting changed: You have leverage you never had before

By Lynne Curry Question: I left a senior position in a large practice when the pandemic and four children at home forced me out of the workforce. At first, my now ex-husband and I thought I’d take a month off, get the kids settled and return to on-site work. But COVID-19 dragged on, and I couldn’t see leaving the kids at home to fend for themselves while I returned to 10-hour workdays. Then, my personal life turned upside down. Now, I need to return to work. I dread it. I want a job, but no longer want to be a superwoman who can handle a high-profile, high-stress career and still parent. I need “normal.” Forty, maybe 45 hours a week is all I’m willing to give, maybe more if an… . . . read more.

MANAGING STAFF

Recession: Get ready for new employer-employee reality

By Lynne Curry The talent war seemed like it would last forever. Employers desperate to fill vacancies but unable to find solid job candidates; applicants receiving multiple job offers; employees expecting more from their employers and using their newfound leverage. Both employees and employers gained as a result. Employers developed compelling value propositions to attract new employees and gained clarity concerning their mission and what they needed and expected from employees. Employers took a fresh look at their pay, benefits packages, and training options. After they recovered from sticker shock, they reaped benefits in the form of engaged, high-performing employees. Employees landed jobs with employers that provided them tangible and intangible benefits in the form of competitive wages, enhanced benefits packages, work/life balancing flexibility and career-enhancing professional development. But things didn’t work… . . . read more.

HIRING

Should you rehire a boomerang employee?

By Lynne Curry “I’ve learned my lesson and I’d like to come back.” One by one “boomerang” employees are returning to employers throughout the nation. Each employee has a story. Said one, “I’d always wanted to start my own business. Now that I tried it; I’ve learned it’s not for me.” Said another, “I wasn’t looking for a job. An employer sought me out, offered me a signing bonus and made other promises. But once I started there, none of those promises panned out.” If you’re an employer, should you rehire an employee who wants to return? Here are the reasons you should; the reasons you shouldn’t, and the precautions you need to take. If you’re an employer with hard-to-fill vacancies and want to inspire former employees to return, here’s… . . . read more.

HIRING

How to find out if the candidate can actually do the job

By Karen Zupko Have you ever hired someone whose professed skill levels during the interview turned out to be lower than you were led to believe? It’s difficult to measure skills and abilities through interview questions alone. Unless you assess candidate skills using objective screening tools, you’ll often be disappointed. Here are 4 ways to reduce the disconnect and hire better candidates. 1. Verify keyboard speed and proficiency. Whether you’re hiring front desk, clinical, or billing staff, or a manager or surgery counselor, everyone in a modern practice must have speedy, efficient keyboard skills. Slow typing impacts team productivity, and inaccurate typing increases the risk of denied claims and electronic health record (EHR) data entry mistakes. Every candidate for every role should be asked to take a typing test. You… . . . read more.

HIRING

Adopt these four best practices for successful staff onboarding

A structured onboarding process can lead to a better start for your employees, resulting in better retention and productivity. That’s the word from Paul Edwards, CEO and founder of Cedr Solutions, a provider of custom employee handbooks, management software and HR support. He suggests these four best practices to add to your process. 1. Begin onboarding before your employee’s first day. After you provide your employee with an offer letter stating the basic terms of at-will employment at your business and explaining that their employment is contingent upon passing a background check, you should start making sure you and your team are prepared for the employee’s first day at the office. This includes: Entering their information and paperwork into your HR management system. Preparing all new-hire documentation Setting up their work… . . . read more.

MANAGING STAFF

Gen Z: Avoid crucial mistakes when managing them

By Lynne Curry Question: We’re hiring a group of young office interns this summer for a special project and are trying to figure out the best team member to supervise them. We’re thinking someone as close in age to them as possible. Your thoughts? Answer: You’re hiring Gen Z workers, individuals born after 1995. The oldest Gen Z workers are 27, and while similar to Gen Y employees are as different from Gen Y workers as Gen Y employees are from Gen Xers. It surprises many that Gen X managers fare worse when managing Gen Y employees than do Baby Boomer managers, those born prior to 1964. Thus, don’t let age be your deciding factor. Gen Zers crave independence and consider themselves self-directed, even if they aren’t. It’s easy to… . . . read more.

YOUR CAREER

Healthcare job boom seen by 2030

The most lucrative job of 2030 will be registered nursing, with a projected job growth of 15 percent in the next decade. Writing for Allwork, Daniel Lehewych says success in the future of work will be determined by how much workers are willing to expand their skill set. Software development will be the most lucrative STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics) job by 2030. He reported 62% of Americans are considering changing their job in 2022. And at least 36% are making such considerations for the sake of earning more money. The healthcare industry will see the biggest boom in lucrative jobs. The COVID-19 pandemic has proven to be devastating to healthcare systems. As a result, healthcare providers are tired, and many are even quitting jobs they’ve had for decades to escape the overwhelming… . . . read more.

HIRING

It’s harder to find and keep office workers

Echoing reports of ongoing labor shortages, a new survey confirms that a vast majority of organizations are facing extreme difficulty finding and retaining qualified workers. But, the survey reveals, these challenges are no longer being driven solely by a lack manual services workers, as previous trends have indicated. Rather, office workers are now significantly harder to both find and retain than just one year ago. The Conference Board survey found that 84 percent of organizations hiring professional and office workers are struggling to find talent, an increase from 60 percent in April 2021. And the percent of organizations struggling to retain office workers more than doubled in the last year, from 28 percent to 64 percent. The survey of more than 175 US Human Resource executives also underscores the staying… . . . read more.

HIRING

Candidate ghosting: They’re just not that into you

Candidate ghosting is taking an increasing toll on employers, new research from talent solutions and business consulting firm Robert Half suggests. In a survey of more than 800 senior managers, more than four in 10 respondents (43 per cent) said it’s more common for job candidates to cut off communication now than two years ago. Why candidates ghost In a separate survey, professionals revealed the main reason for ghosting a prospective employer: The job was not what they expected (43 per cent) The interview process was poor (31 per cent) They received another job offer (18 per cent) A mandatory return-to-office policy was implemented (8 per cent) And what to do about it “Today’s candidate-driven market is incredibly challenging for employers as skilled professionals are often juggling multiple job interviews… . . . read more.


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