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YOUR CAREER

Should I take a ‘dry’ promotion (without a raise)?

By Lynne Curry Question: An email with the subject line “good news” arrived in my inbox from my supervisor this morning. The good news I hoped for flashed across my mind as I imagined him saying he was moving to another state, and I’d be getting a new supervisor. He didn’t like me, and I didn’t like him. Instead, he told me I was being offered a promotion. He didn’t look pleased but said, “congratulations,” and handed me the paperwork I needed to sign “to make it official”. “Who’s my new supervisor?” “You’ll still report to me.” “What’s the raise?” “About that. This is a dry promotion.” “A what?” “A promotion without a raise. They happen all the time.” “You’re kidding.” “No. But you can always turn it down.” I… . . . read more.

WORKING WITH PATIENTS

Creating an inclusive and safe space for the LGBTQ+ community in a medical office

As a medical office manager, you play a pivotal role in ensuring that your healthcare facility is a safe and welcoming space for all individuals. It is important to prioritize inclusivity, especially for members of the LGBTQ+ community, including staff, patients, their families, vendors, and visitors. By establishing a safe space, you not only provide quality healthcare but also promote trust, comfort, and well-being. Why Create a Safe Space? Ethical and Patient-Centered Care: As a healthcare provider, your primary focus is to deliver patient-centered care. By creating a safe space, you demonstrate your commitment to providing compassionate and inclusive care to all individuals, irrespective of their sexual orientation or gender identity. Health Equity and Reduced Disparities: Members of the LGBTQ+ community often face healthcare disparities and discrimination. By establishing an… . . . read more.

TOOLS

Sample policy for a medical office on diversity, equity and inclusion

Office Policy on Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Policy Statement: At [Medical Office Name], we are committed to fostering a diverse, equitable, and inclusive work environment that values and respects the diversity of our employees, patients, and the communities we serve. We believe that diversity, equity, and inclusion are essential to providing quality healthcare and promoting overall well-being. This policy outlines our commitment to creating a workplace that is free from discrimination, bias, and harassment, and promotes equal access to healthcare for all. Equal Treatment and Non-Discrimination: 1.1. [Medical Office Name] is an equal opportunity employer and is committed to providing equal treatment and opportunities to all employees, regardless of their race, color, ethnicity, national origin, gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, religion, age, disability, or any other characteristic protected by applicable… . . . read more.

EMPLOYMENT LAW UPDATE

Non-compete agreements and deceiving your employer

By Lynne Curry Question: I was so stoked when the premier firm in my area of professional services hired me that I did something I’ve wanted to do for a long time. I told my former manager what I thought of her. She ordered me to leave her company immediately. No problem, I had a new job to go to. I also had my entire future mapped out. I’d work for my new employer for a year, learn everything I could, and then start my business. I told all my friends my new job was the ideal stepping stone. On my first day when I went through orientation, my new manager handed me an employment agreement that included a noncompete agreement. It was a complete shock. I’d never seen one… . . . read more.

TOOL

Model Policy: Office Temperature

The purpose of this model policy is to ensure a comfortable and healthy work environment for all staff and patients by maintaining appropriate temperature settings in the medical office.

HIRING

“You’re not hired:” Leaving job candidates hanging can hurt your reputation

When companies engage with job candidates, a new survey reveals the importance of following up—even if they opt not to hire them. The Conference Board survey found that 18 percent of candidates who didn’t hear back from a company after an interview took a negative action against the company. That includes declining to recommend it to others or leaving a negative review. And only 7 percent applied for another job at the same company in the future. Indeed, businesses that don’t respond to job seekers risk taking a reputational hit, losing out on future talent who read a negative review, heard an unfavorable opinion about the company, or who felt mistreated during a previous experience with them. Additionally, the survey revealed that the number of interviews a candidate must endure… . . . read more.

WORKING WITH PATIENTS

Why and how to find translators for your patients

In today’s diverse world, it’s essential for healthcare providers to be able to communicate effectively with patients of all backgrounds. Sometimes this task falls to families, friends or supporters of a patient. These helpers are not always available or able to help. This is where medical translators come in. In this article, we’ll explore why your medical office might need translators and how to acquire them. Why Your Medical Office May Need Translators: Improved Patient Care: Patients who don’t speak the language of their healthcare providers are more likely to miss out on important information regarding their diagnosis, treatment, and medication. This can lead to misunderstandings, miscommunication, and ultimately poorer patient outcomes. Medical translators can help bridge this communication gap, improving patient care. Legal Compliance: Medical facilities that receive federal… . . . read more.

HIRING

Create a great job description and make it your blueprint for hiring

By Robert Half Trying to compete for top medical office talent in a tough hiring market? Here’s another question: Do you know how to create a job description that can help you find the right candidates and set the stage for a new employee’s success? The job description is your hiring blueprint, and it needs to be thoroughly thought (or rethought) through. Do it well, and the rest of the hiring process—from evaluating resumes and job applications to candidate selection, interviews and salary negotiation—will flow much more easily. But writing it poorly risks a prolonged, expensive hiring process and increases the possibility of making a bad hire. As you gather details to update or write a job description, you may want to seek input, if appropriate, from key personnel who will work directly with the new hire. These individuals may be… . . . read more.

HIRING

Prepare and practice for conducting an online job interview

By Robert Half By now, you’ve likely discovered the advantages of conducting a remote interview. It’s convenient for you and the candidate, it’s easier to schedule separate interviews with the hiring committee, it saves you the cost of a candidate’s lunch or travel expenses, and you can conduct more assessments more quickly. Most importantly, and especially in this very challenging labor market,  the remote interview allows you to meet your top candidates and make a hiring decision before many old-school competitors can even finalize arrangements for an on-site meet-and-greet. Still, the remote interview presents a few complications. Details you never had to consider when interviewing at the office—your background, screen presence and technology, for example—must now be part of any well-planned meeting. Otherwise, you risk mishaps that can distract and… . . . read more.

HIRING

Dig deeper with these 4 types of interview questions

By Robert Half If you want to identify the best candidate for a job, you have to ask the right questions during the interview. And that takes preparation. You need to evaluate not only the job candidate’s skill sets and experience but also how the interviewee thinks. That requires you to ask the right types of interview questions, with both closed-ended questions and open-ended questions. Other kinds of queries can produce even more nuanced information to help you with your hiring decision. Here are four types of interview questions employers ask, including when to use them— and pitfalls to avoid. 1. Closed-ended interview questions This category of job interview questions calls for simple, informational answers. Often, they can be just a “yes” or “no,” but you should give candidates an opportunity to… . . . read more.


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