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MANAGING PATIENTS

Model Policy: Patient termination

Why you need this policy:

There are lots of legitimate reasons to want to terminate a patient. In the best case scenario, termination makes sense when the patient is “cured” and no longer needs to see the doctor. More often than not, termination is necessitated by less favorable changes in medical conditions and often for aspects of the relationship having nothing to do with treatment—like a patient’s violence, theft and other inappropriate behavior. Unfortunately, as a matter of law and ethics, terminating a patient isn’t a simple matter.

RISK MANAGEMENT

Model Policy: Exposure control

Why you need this policy:

Health care employees face risk of exposure to deadly bloodborne infections.

RISK MANAGEMENT

Model Policy: OSHA bloodborne pathogens exposure control

Why you need this policy:

All medical practices need infection control policies and procedures. And with regard to one particular form of infection—bloodborne pathogens that get into the bloodstream via puncture or piercing by contaminated needles or other medical sharps—QA measures must include a specific exposure control policy that meets the requirements of the federal workplace safety law called OSHA (the Occupational Safety and Health Act)—specifically, the regulation or “standard” dealing with bloodborne pathogens.

COMPLIANCE

Model Policy: HIPAA notice of privacy practices

Why you need this policy:

HIPAA requires medical practices to prepare and post a Notice of Privacy Practice (NPP) notifying patients of their rights to their own personal health information (PHI) and how the practice uses and discloses the PHI it collects from patients. The NPP is as old as the HIPAA law itself; but recent changes (contained in a law called the HITECH Act—Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health) to the privacy rule require medical practices to modify their NPP by Sept. 23, 2013.


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